THE WOLD NEWTON UNIVERSE1795 - Wold Newton meteor strike: Eighteen individuals "were riding in two coaches past Wold Newton, Yorkshire.... A meteorite struck only twenty yards from the two coaches.... The bright light and heat and thunderous roar of the meteorite blinded and terrorized the passengers, coachmen, and horses.... They never guessed, being ignorant of ionization, that the fallen star had affected them and their unborn." Tarzan Alive, Addendum 2, pp. 247-248. The meteor strike was "the single cause of this nova of genetic splendor, this outburst of great detectives, scientists, and explorers of exotic worlds, this last efflorescence of true heroes in an otherwise degenerate age." Id., pp.230-231.         Artwork by Lisa Eckert

Maintained by Win Scott Eckert

 

Presenting the Wold Newton Universe at the 2006 San Diego Comic Con

By Win Eckert, John Small, Brad Mengel, Chuck Loridans, and Pete Coogan

 

Thursday, July 20, 2006:10:30-11:30 am: Comic Arts Conference Session #1: Myths for the Modern Age — In the tradition of Philip Josť Farmer's famous hoax biography Tarzan Alive, contributors to Myths for the Modern Age: Philip Jose Farmer's Wold Newton Universe (MonkeyBrain Books) present their parascholarship with a straight face, treating comic book as the reports of the adventures of real-life people. Win Eckert ("Foreword," Tarzan Alive) brings forward evidence to show that DC Comics' Doc Savage series of the 1990s, dismissed by many scholars because of numerous inconsistencies, in fact portrays events from Doc Savage's life consistent with the original pulp super-sagas. Brad Mengel settles the longstanding question of the Man of Bronze's true family name—"Savage" as asserted in the pulps, or—"Wildman" as Farmer revealed in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life. Chuck Loridans reveals evidence recently uncovered from the files of Richard Henry Benson (aka The Avenger) that suggests that the Jungle Lord may have sired two daughters, Modesty Blaise and Nellie Gray. John Small presents a compelling case that the woman known as Vampirella was born Anita Santiago and adventured with Zorro as Lady Rawhide. Peter Coogan (Superhero: The Secret Origin of a Genre) pulls the curtain back and discusses the principles of Wold-Newtonry employed in the essays. Room 7B


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